knocking in a crickat bat

Cricket Bat Preparation

Posted on 24/10/2016 by Admin Author

Bat Preparation Guideline’s ( Oiling & Knocking In )

B3 Cricket bats are made from the very finest English willow which is obviously a natural product. The attributes of English willow can vary enormously and that’s why every bat is unique.

 

This is also the key reason we press every B3 bat individually. This enables our expert bat makers to use their experience to maximise the performance or “ping” of every bat. Some bats need more pressing, others less. Some bats “ping” from the outset, others need a bit more knocking-in and get better with age.

 

One thing is certain, every bat will eventually wear out due to usage, it’s inevitable when wood is repeatedly hit by a hard cricket ball.

 

In order to prolong the life and get the most out of your B3 cricket bat please follow the following guidelines.

 

Step 1: Oiling

Oiling a cricket bat used to be an absolute given but nowadays it is more subjective. Opinion on the benefits of oiling a bat are also varied; some insist that applying raw linseed oil softens the fibres and enhances bat performance, others say it protects and seals the bat and keeps the moisture content even.

 

On the other hand, some players prefer not to oil their bat because they don’t like the darker colour it gives to the willow.

 

B3 Recommendation’s

At B3 we are happy for you to decide what you do in regard to oiling your bat. If you don’t it will not affect your warranty.

 

Our general opinion is that a single light coat of raw linseed oil to the exposed willow is good practice.

 

If you do oil your bat then we recommend the following process:

  • Oil the bat before you commence the knocking in process.
  • Only use approved bat oil. This should be raw linseed oil.
  • Only oil the exposed areas of the bat (edges, toe* and back of the bat).
  • If the bat has a factory fitted anti-scuff sheet then there is no need to oil the face of the bat because the sheet seals the face of the bat and protects it.
  • Apply a single coat of raw linseed oil applied with a soft rag or cloth.
  • After the bat has been oiled it should be allowed to rest so the oil can soak in for at least 24 hours.

        * If the bat has a Toe Guard then there is no need to oil the toe.

 

Step 2: Knocking-In

Knocking in your B3 cricket bat is essential and it may invalidate your warranty if you do not knock your bat in properly. Every bat needs between 2 and 3 hours knocking in with a proper bat mallet. An old ball in a sock is not adequate.

 

What Does Knocking In Do?

Knocking in your bat with a proper bat mallet will help to condition the fibres in the face of the bat and prepare it for the impact of new, hard cricket balls.

 

B3 Recommendation’s

Below we describe the correct knocking in process dependent on how you have bought your bat from us:

 

  1. B3 factory knocked in:

If you have bought your bat “pre-knocked in” by B3 then we will have spent at least 1 hour knocking in the edges and toe areas of the bat with a special bat mallet. This is what we call the primary stage of the knocking-in process.

 

If you have bought your bat with edge tape and/or an anti-scuff sheet, then we will have fitted it at this stage. It is now up to you to complete the knocking in process.

 

Because we will have concentrated on the edges and toe, you can concentrate on the main hitting area. This will also avoid disrupting the edge tape / anti-scuff sheet.

 

Knocking-in should be followed up by at least 2 or 3 net practice sessions where you further condition the bat with used balls in a “throw downs” scenario.

 

You will gradually begin to feel the performance of the bat improve the more you knock it in. If the bat face can still be dented or shows seam marks from hard balls then it probably needs more knocking-in.

 

  1. Self knocked in:

If you are knocking-in your bat entirely yourself then you should follow the above instructions but add an additional hour for the primary knocking in stage. The first hour should concentrate on the edges and toe areas of the bat with a proper bat mallet. You should now commence the secondary knocking-in and spend at least 2 hours using a bat mallet.

 

Knocking-in should be followed up by at least 2 or 3 net practice sessions where you further condition the bat with used balls in a “throw downs” scenario.

 

You will gradually begin to feel the performance of the bat improve the more you knock it in. If the bat face can still be dented or shows seam marks from hard balls then it probably needs more knocking-in.